He might still be alive today

István Cári senior became sick during the preparations for a pig slaughter early in the morning on February 25, 2011. His son and acquaintances who were there called the nearby doctor. They went to her house and also called the ambulance to no avail, as the doctor didn’t help, and the ambulance arrived late.

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Because of the proceedings, István Cári jr. pressed charges; the police investigated in this case of missing assistance. The HCLU represented István Cári in the ethical proceedings in front of the Hungarian Medical Chamber. The first instance decision found that the doctor did not commit an ethical violation, although only her behavior after she finally came down to the inquest was discussed.

On the grounds of the Health Law and the continuous health care enactment, the National Public Health and Medical Officer Service also made an investigation that didn’t condemn the doctor, claiming that she is not the person who should have been called, but the medics on duty. However, the Health Law concerning all health workers – meaning doctors as well – states that in cases of urgent need, regardless of place and time, they have to act reasonably under the circumstances, and provide first aid to people in need according to their means, and to take the necessary measures without delay. Urgent need is a situation in which the absence of immediate medical care to the patient directly endangers their life or causes serious or irreversible damage. The law also notes that if it is not clear whether there is such a situation, the health worker must act as if there was. We believe that the doctor could have investigated the cause of the shouting, which she heard- as shown by her testimony on the phone call, and her statement in a newspaper- this would have been her obligation as a medical professional.

The Ethical Committee – in a not yet a legally binding declaration – stated that the doctor did not violate the rules imposed upon her with her behavior; not the regulations on the treatment of the patients, or the preservation of human dignity. It is true that István Cári jr. was not the patient of the doctor in this case, but we believe that this case highlights why it is so difficult to prove a violation of human dignity in the proceedings relating to complaints regarding health care.

Megosztás

Kapcsolódó hírek

“He even kicked the bike”

We have presented similar stories on our blog many times. So it was not a one-time occurence, that’s for sure. At least not in Heves or Borsod county. What we’re talking about here, is that some policemen take pleasure in fining very poor people, who are mostly Romas, for breaking bicycle rules, all the time. Who they fine and how much they fine them for depends on the policeman’s discrimination and mood, rather than the bicycle laws. The man in this video lives in Eger.

'A poor man is pulled even by the branch of a tree'

I wonder how many cyclists are stopped in a wealthy neighborhood of a bigger city each year due to worn out tires, missing winter tires, missing reflector, or because of a disconnected brake cable? All of us who use such vehicles commit similar petty offenses. The lives of Borsod county’s (Hungary) Roma people – who live in poverty - are embittered by the police. They periodically give unnecessarily harsh fines of 10,20,30 thousand HUF (approximately 40,80,120 €).

The HCLU's movies shared a Special Award at the Hégető Honorka Prize ceremony

The aim of the Prize is to acknowledge television and online video works aimed at highlighting the problems of marginalised groups, and raising public and media awareness. It is a big honour for us to be awarded this prize in 2013.