How can a light shine when it's facing the sun?

In our video, you can hear about Joseph’s story, which is yet another example of the typical attitude of the police in Borsod and Heves Counties: they fine local Roma for acts that are unnoticeable, and the punishment doesn’t nearly fit the crime, if they even committed a crime at all.

 In Szomolya, Joseph was riding his bike, properly equipped with a bike light when he bumped into the police. He went into a store, and while he was gone, someone stole his bike light. Immediately after this, the police identity checked him and fined him 25 thousand forints, because he was missing a bike light. He tried to tell them that they had already seen him with the light, but it was all in vain. Another time he was fined 10 thousand because one of his wheels was missing 2-3 spokes and his wheel was uneven. They tested to see if his bike light was working, shining it towards the sun, and the cops decided that it wasn’t working. All this added up to almost 100 thousand forints in fines. Joseph and his partner live off of 23 thousand forints (about 120 dollars), so it was impossible for him to pay the fine in one piece. He tried to arrange paying it off in chunks of 3-4 thousand but the local court wouldn’t have it, and instead they sentenced him to jail. Joseph spent a whole month in jail.

For English subtitles: start the video and click on the "cc" button!

Most people hardly hear or know anything about the living conditions and everyday concerns of the Roma population living in extreme poverty, often in segregated settlements.

During their visits in North-Eastern Hungary, our colleagues interview locals about the issues they are currently most concerned with. The aim of our new series entitled “Make Your Voice Seen” is to deliver the messages of these people to a broader public.

 

 

Megosztás

Kapcsolódó hírek

I am afraid to speak up

Roma travelling by bicycle in Kesznyéten are systematically fined for trivialities and receive disproportionate fines for minor offences. When our film crew visited Kesznyéten, they interviewed non-Roma cyclists as well. Out of these randomly chosen 10 individuals there was only one person who had received a fine for a cycling offence. Even though on average (as seen in the accompanying video), their bicycles were not in better condition or better equipped. Still, the Non-Roma travelling by bicycle are not even stopped by the police.

Shadow Report about the Events at Gyöngyöspata

The ad hoc committee that investigates the events at Gyöngyöspata held its first substantial session on September 28.The HCLU published its Shadow Report and documentary video about the events the same day. The Committee was established by the two-third government majority in the Parliament through a resolution that was enacted on June 7.

The summary of the Shadow Report can be found attached.

"Did you stop my husband because of his skin color?"

We were in Eger once again. Every day, around Verőszala Street, Roma riding on their bikes are fined by the police. Over a one-month period, Csaba has received 150,000 forints (nearly 1,000 dollars) worth of fines. The incident he recounts in our video is expansive because he was riding with his non-Roma wife, who did not have a light on her bike, yet the police stopped him instead of his wife.