How can a light shine when it's facing the sun?

In our video, you can hear about Joseph’s story, which is yet another example of the typical attitude of the police in Borsod and Heves Counties: they fine local Roma for acts that are unnoticeable, and the punishment doesn’t nearly fit the crime, if they even committed a crime at all.

 In Szomolya, Joseph was riding his bike, properly equipped with a bike light when he bumped into the police. He went into a store, and while he was gone, someone stole his bike light. Immediately after this, the police identity checked him and fined him 25 thousand forints, because he was missing a bike light. He tried to tell them that they had already seen him with the light, but it was all in vain. Another time he was fined 10 thousand because one of his wheels was missing 2-3 spokes and his wheel was uneven. They tested to see if his bike light was working, shining it towards the sun, and the cops decided that it wasn’t working. All this added up to almost 100 thousand forints in fines. Joseph and his partner live off of 23 thousand forints (about 120 dollars), so it was impossible for him to pay the fine in one piece. He tried to arrange paying it off in chunks of 3-4 thousand but the local court wouldn’t have it, and instead they sentenced him to jail. Joseph spent a whole month in jail.

For English subtitles: start the video and click on the "cc" button!

Most people hardly hear or know anything about the living conditions and everyday concerns of the Roma population living in extreme poverty, often in segregated settlements.

During their visits in North-Eastern Hungary, our colleagues interview locals about the issues they are currently most concerned with. The aim of our new series entitled “Make Your Voice Seen” is to deliver the messages of these people to a broader public.

 

 

Megosztás

Kapcsolódó hírek

Now I ask the questions, and they answer

The aim of the Make your voice heard! project of the HCLU is to facilitate advocacy skills of Roma communities. Therefore, the HCLU trains Romani activists in freedom of information and in participatory rights. This obtained knowledge will help them gain insight into local decision-making processes. By having access to data of public interest and exercising participatory rights, their situation will improve so they can reach the social level of the less underprivileged majority.

 

Authorities take steps against an anti-discriminatory disco

Around Ózd County, clubs usually don’t let any Roma in, which seriously violates equal treatment, and is thus illegal. In the summer of 2009, in Borsodnádas, a new club, which was supposed to be accessible to everyone, opened up.

 

Our biggest problem is unemployment

According to Béla Babos, chairman of the Phralipe Independent Gypsy Organization, the new Communal Work Programme, which came into practice on January 1, 2011, creates further problems with the employment of uneducated Gypsies. In his opinion, the creation of jobs shouldn’t be a local government task, but the task of the national government. Support needs to be given to those living in deep poverty so that they can work.