Protest from a Cage

Árpád Horváth recently put himself in a cage bearing the sign „public order protection camp” on Blaha Lujza tér, a busy Budapest square. In the following footage he talks to HCLU about the motivations behind his action.

For English subtitles: start the video and click on the "cc" button!

Most people hardly hear or know anything about the living conditions and everyday concerns of the Roma population living in extreme poverty, often in segregated settlements.

During their visits in North-Eastern Hungary, our colleagues interview locals about the issues they are currently most concerned with. The aim of our new series entitled “Make Your Voice Seen” is to deliver the messages of these people to a broader public.

Megosztás

Kapcsolódó hírek

He might still be alive today

István Cári senior became sick during the preparations for a pig slaughter early in the morning on February 25, 2011. His son and acquaintances who were there called the nearby doctor. They went to her house and also called the ambulance to no avail, as the doctor didn’t help, and the ambulance arrived late.

Discriminatory fines for motoring offences

In Borsod county in Hungary, Romas (who live in poverty and segregation) on bicycles are fined daily for motoring offences. They are regularly penalized for offences that they haven’t committed, alongside fines for petty offences, such as lack of lamps in broad daylight. The imposed fines are disproportionately high, and extremely difficult to repay. Due to the lack of information, the capacity for legal redress is very low in these peripheral communities. The word of a Roma man against a policeman’s is generally not taken seriously in these courts; penalized people are not able to defend themselves against such infringements on their rights. Does it make sense for the police force to spend tax-payers’ money and allocate its own resources for an undue and unnecessary penalization activity? Is it beneficial for our society to unduly penalize and criminalize the already underprivileged?

"My house will be painted with your blood..."

"...and I’ll have it built on the Gypsy-row, right here!" Threats similar to these, men in masks, whips and spontoons, spitting, calling Gypsies, including children, names or racial slurs, and hatred sometimes escalating to physical violence on one side. Premature birth due to fear, terrorized children pissing in their pants, and desperate adults on the other. During these recurring acts, the majority of the Roma families temporarily fled the settlement.