The Global Drug Prohibition Regime: Half a Century of Failed Policymaking?

Video of the discussion forum at the CEU in Budapest with Wolfgang Reinicke (CEU), Sandeep Chawla (UNODC), Niamh Eastwood (Release), Martin Jelsma (TNI) and Kasia Malinowska-Sempruch (OSF).



The participants of the discussion forum were:

Sandeep Chawla, Deputy Executive Director and Director, Division for Policy Analysis and Public Affairs, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC)
Niamh Eastwood, Executive Director of Release
Martin Jelsma, TNI Drugs and Democracy Programme Coordinator 
Kasia Malinowska-Sempruch, Director of OSF Global Drug Policy Program
Wolfgang Reinicke, Dean, School of Public Policy, CEU
 

THIS ARTICLE IS A DUPLICATION OF THE ORIGINAL AT DRUGREPORTER.NET. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO POST A COMMENT, PLEASE DO SO ON DRUGREPORTER BY CLICKING ON THIS LINK

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Keep It Low!

NeLP was initiated by the HCLU with funding from East-East Partnership Beyond Borders Program of Open Society Foundations. Watch and share our movie about the story of NeLP so far.

Coffee Shops and Compromise: The Success of the Dutch Model

In 1976, the Netherlands separated the cannabis market from the market in other illicit drugs, and allowed coffee shops to sell small amounts of cannabis to adults in a controlled environment. Our new movie, supplementing the report of the Open Society Foundation, tells the story of the Dutch model and highlights its successes, as well as the challenges ahead of it.  

Discriminatory fines for motoring offences

In Borsod county in Hungary, Romas (who live in poverty and segregation) on bicycles are fined daily for motoring offences. They are regularly penalized for offences that they haven’t committed, alongside fines for petty offences, such as lack of lamps in broad daylight. The imposed fines are disproportionately high, and extremely difficult to repay. Due to the lack of information, the capacity for legal redress is very low in these peripheral communities. The word of a Roma man against a policeman’s is generally not taken seriously in these courts; penalized people are not able to defend themselves against such infringements on their rights. Does it make sense for the police force to spend tax-payers’ money and allocate its own resources for an undue and unnecessary penalization activity? Is it beneficial for our society to unduly penalize and criminalize the already underprivileged?