Breaking Down the Vienna Consensus on Drugs

The consensus behind global drug prohibition is fading - watch the new video we filmed at the high level UN meeting in Vienna and find out why!

In 2009, the member states of the United Nations reaffirmed the dream of a drug-free world, adopting a political declaration which aimed to eliminate or significantly reduce drug trafficking within ten years. Five years later, a high-level segment of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) was convened in Vienna, to discuss the mid-term review of the implementation of this plan. The meeting revealed a growing depth of disagreement on global drug policies. Most governments think the UN is on the right track, and that with more commitment and resources, it will be possible to improve the fight against drugs. But dissonant voices are getting stronger. Many governments are now disillusioned by the overwhelming evidence that punitive drug policies do not work. and are pushing for a debate on the alternatives. Some of them are in open rebellion against the drug conventions - such as Uruguay, which has introduced legal regulation of cannabis production and distribution for recreational use. What are the key issues that divide the United Nations? Is the international drug control system losing relevance? What can we expect from the UN General Assembly on Drugs in 2016? The film we produced in Vienna aims to provide answers to these questions.

Read the CND blog for more information!

Posted by Peter Sarosi
Video: Istvan Gabor Takács and Peter Sarosi

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