Hungary is under review by the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child

Hungary ratified the UN Convention on the rights of the child in 1993. For the third time - after 1998 and then 2006 - the Committee reviews Hungary's compliance with the Convention. A coalition of NGOs - including the HCLU - has reported to the Committee.

Representatives of Hungaran National Committee for UNICEF, the Chance For Children Foundation and the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union attended a pre-session hearing held on 5 February 2014. The NGO representatives provided detailed description of children’s rights in Hungary.

(English subtitle is available)
After the hearing the Committee has published the list of issues - a number of questions - which shall be answered by the Government of Hungary by 15 June, 2014. The Committee requested the Government to provide information about the content of the National Strategy “Making Better For Children” for (2007-2032) and about the independent body responsible for monitoring issues related to children’s rights. The Government is required to inform the Committee about measures taken to eradicate discrimination against Roma children, children with disabilities, migrant and refugee children and about steps taken to prevent institutionalization of children. Furthermore, the Committee requested the Government to provide information about the use of EU funds for desinstitutionalisation of children and measures taken to increase the adoption prospective for Roma children, children with disabilities or with chronic diseases. The Government of Hungary shall inform the Committee of measure taken to prevent and reduce the mental health problems among adolescents. The Committee further requested information about measures taken to integrate Roma children into mainstream schools and prevent further segregation.
The complete list of issues is available here.

Megosztás

Kapcsolódó hírek

The HCLU's movies shared a Special Award at the Hégető Honorka Prize ceremony

The aim of the Prize is to acknowledge television and online video works aimed at highlighting the problems of marginalised groups, and raising public and media awareness. It is a big honour for us to be awarded this prize in 2013.

Does bias (not) count!?

The police failed to consider that the assault on the chairmen of the Raoul Wallenberg Association bears an anti-semitic bias and failed to investigate the incident as hate crime despite the fact that the law provides greater protection for the victims of hate crime. Apparently, the judicial practice presents deficiencies in this area.

How can a light shine when it's facing the sun?

In our video, you can hear about Joseph’s story, which is yet another example of the typical attitude of the police in Borsod and Heves Counties: they fine local Roma for acts that are unnoticeable, and the punishment doesn’t nearly fit the crime, if they even committed a crime at all.