"My house will be painted with your blood..."

"...and I’ll have it built on the Gypsy-row, right here!" Threats similar to these, men in masks, whips and spontoons, spitting, calling Gypsies, including children, names or racial slurs, and hatred sometimes escalating to physical violence on one side. Premature birth due to fear, terrorized children pissing in their pants, and desperate adults on the other. During these recurring acts, the majority of the Roma families temporarily fled the settlement.

Through personal accounts, our film presents what happened in the first half of March 2011 in Gyöngyöspata, how the local Roma community experienced the “patrolling” of uniformed fake guardians of the law, their harassing presence, and racist remarks, over many days.

For English subtitles: start the video and click on the "cc" button!

In the three cases quoted in the film, the HCLU’s attorneys filed charges in the name of the plaintiffs for crimes against members of a community and other crimes. 

 The Roma people speaking in this video claim that the police did not protect them against these atrocities (the complaints against the police refer to the period before riot control forces from Budapest and Miskolc were ordered to the village). They reported the illegal atrocities committed against them in vain, because local police refused to deal with the complaints of the Roma, while being visibly accomodating with the uniformed men and women committing these fear-inducing acts. The HCLU urges disciplinary action against the policemen who failed to take action and start proceedings.
Due to the fact that the persons claiming to be militia were allowed into a school and because of the principal’s remark which we can hear in the film and which terrified the children (“There will be blood!”), the HCLU turns to the maintainer of the school first.

Megosztás

Kapcsolódó hírek

"Did you stop my husband because of his skin color?"

We were in Eger once again. Every day, around Verőszala Street, Roma riding on their bikes are fined by the police. Over a one-month period, Csaba has received 150,000 forints (nearly 1,000 dollars) worth of fines. The incident he recounts in our video is expansive because he was riding with his non-Roma wife, who did not have a light on her bike, yet the police stopped him instead of his wife.

Our biggest problem is unemployment

According to Béla Babos, chairman of the Phralipe Independent Gypsy Organization, the new Communal Work Programme, which came into practice on January 1, 2011, creates further problems with the employment of uneducated Gypsies. In his opinion, the creation of jobs shouldn’t be a local government task, but the task of the national government. Support needs to be given to those living in deep poverty so that they can work.

 

Authorities take steps against an anti-discriminatory disco

Around Ózd County, clubs usually don’t let any Roma in, which seriously violates equal treatment, and is thus illegal. In the summer of 2009, in Borsodnádas, a new club, which was supposed to be accessible to everyone, opened up.