The HCLU Is Dismayed at the FIDESZ-fraction's Cordon-removal Action

The HCLU human rights organization would like to call attention to the fact, that even though the current situation at Kossuth square is undoubtedly due to the cynical, unlawful and unacceptable attitude of the police, in a democratic state there is no place for unlawful action even if authorities are believed to be behaving in an unlawful way.

It is apparent, that if ordinary citizens and not members of parliament would have started today's actions, the police would have acted against them without further ado. The police were impotent against the members of parliament bearing the right to immunity, even though this right does not protect them in case of apparent law-breaking and being caught during the unlawful act.

As expected, the police could not step up against the 150 parliament members at the square, thus the message is clear: politicians can do anything, laws do not apply to them.

The HCLU's opinion is, that with respect to Hungary being a democratic nation, responding to unlawful and even human rights infringing conduct by the police can only be handled by lawful means. Friday's action by the members of FIDESZ do not qualify as such, therefore considering it an example for the public is an irresponsible and cynical attitude.

Megosztás

Kapcsolódó hírek

Litigation on the right to protest

Two actions were launched by the HCLU regarding the right to peaceful assembly in December, 2013. Both actions concern to the same problem: lockdown of a public area around the Prime Minister's residence. In the first case, the police dispersed an ongoing peaceful demonstration on the grounds of closing off the area, for which the organizer filed a claim against the police with the help of HCLU. In the other case, another demonstration planned by the same organizer at the same venue was banned by the court, which was then challenged before the Constitutional Court. Both decisions are ill-unfounded and misinterpret the constitutional limitations of the right to protest.

Civil Liberties Groups from 10 Countries Launch Coalition to Reshape Human Rights Landscape

In response to increasing restrictions on personal freedoms and civil protest, independent national human rights organisations from ten countries today launched the International Network of Civil Liberties Organisations (INCLO). They also released “Take Back the Streets: Repression and Criminalisation of Protest Around the World,” a collection of nine case studies showing patterns of police crackdown and abuse against peaceful assembly, accompanied by concrete recommendations to expand free speech.

Letter to the Minister of Justice and Law Enforcement

The HCLU has written a letter to Tibor Draskovics, Hungarian Minister of Justice and Law Enforcement, to question why private security services were allowed to check identities and search the clothing of citizens during the March 15th National State Ceremonies.