The Right to Protest: New online project

OpenDemocracy, CELS and INCLO are launching a new minisite on The Right to Protest, with support from the ACLU.

Throughout this week, activists, experts and academics will be contributing to our new project on The Right to Protest, which includes articles, interviews, videos and photo essays from around the world. They highlight the power of protest and the many links between social protest and human rights, at a time when people are mobilizing more than ever.

The project kicks off with:

-overview on the rise in large-scale protests worldwide

-interview on the Black Lives Matter movement

-analysis of the Mothers of Plaza de Mayo’s 40-year-long fight for justice

-article on protests where the question “Where is Santiago Maldonado?” resounds

-reflections by a former UN Special Rapporteur on state management of assemblies

-an Israeli photojournalist’s project on Palestinians injured by sponge-tipped bullets

This week, we will also dig deeper into how crowd control weapons are used to repress protests, with sometimes fatal consequences, and how states wield digital surveillance to chill the right to protest and persecute social leaders.

From our perspective, social protest and human rights are inextricably intertwined: first, because people often take to the streets to protest violations of their rights. Also, the act of protest itself entails exercising rights, such as to freedom of expression and the rights of assembly, petition and dissent. Finally, state intervention in public mobilizations often ends up violating demonstrators’ rights – to liberty, health and, in the most extreme cases, to life.

CELS and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) are two of the 13 national organizations belonging to the International Network of Civil Liberties Organizations (INCLO), which works on Police Brutality and Social Protest as one of its three priority issues. This partnership on The Right to Protest is between openDemocracy, CELS and INCLO, with support from the ACLU.

Megosztás

Kapcsolódó hírek

Fuck State Arrogance

After being reported to police by unnamed individuals, Dopeman, a Hungarian rapper was summoned to the police station and questioned as a witness after coming out with a rap song which contained lines from the Hungarian National Anthem.

When there are kinks even in the cables

The man who spoke to the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union (HCLU) representative had a bike with all the necessary accessories, yet the police still fined him. It seems that the general mandate of KRESZ (rules of the road) leaves room for policemen to, by all means, punish those who they choose to punish.

Garbage trucks do not enter Gypsy settlement

It is a common occurrence in Borsod county in Hungary, that where the Gypsy settlements begin, paved roads end. There is no running water or sewage system, and the local government does not provide waste removal services.
Such areas are treated as if they were not public places, as though the communal and civil service obligations of the local governments stopped at the borders of the Gypsy settlements.