Joint position paper put forward by NGOs on the Hungarian Media Law and its Application

Hungarian Europe Society, Hungarian Civil Liberties Union, Eötvös Károly Public Policy Institute, Standard (Mérték) Media Monitor put forward a joint position paper to the High Level Group on Media Freedom and Pluralism created by the European Commission on the Hungarian Media Law and its Application.

For the executive summary of the joint position paper click here.

For the full text of the joint position paper click here.
For the summary of the decision of the Constitutional Court on the Media Laws click here.

Megosztás

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