Even this can happen in Borsod

In our following “message,” a young man explains to HCLU (Hungarian Civil Liberties Union) the story of an identity check, in which policemen committed a series of unlawful actions against him, presumably due to his Roma heritage.

For English subtitles: start the video and click on the "cc" button!

Most people hardly hear or know anything about the living conditions and everyday concerns of the Roma population living in extreme poverty, often in segregated settlements.

During their visits in North-Eastern Hungary, our colleagues interview locals about the issues they are currently most concerned with. The aim of our new series entitled “Make Your Voice Seen” is to deliver the messages of these people to a broader public.

Megosztás

Kapcsolódó hírek

He might still be alive today

István Cári senior became sick during the preparations for a pig slaughter early in the morning on February 25, 2011. His son and acquaintances who were there called the nearby doctor. They went to her house and also called the ambulance to no avail, as the doctor didn’t help, and the ambulance arrived late.

She could not handle him: she tied him down

This is another example of teachers’ sadism which happened almost at the same time as the head butting incident. The teacher tied the eight year old little boy to a chair with a skipping rope, because he did not ask for permission to take his eraser to his sibling. The child was tied down for approximately ten minutes and finally his sibling untied him. The boy felt so ashamed that he did not dare to tell the story to his parents at home. The father visited the headmaster at the school where the teacher admitted her act, pleading that did it because she could not handle him. As the headmaster did not want to take any measures against the teacher, the father reported the case to the police.

"My house will be painted with your blood..."

"...and I’ll have it built on the Gypsy-row, right here!" Threats similar to these, men in masks, whips and spontoons, spitting, calling Gypsies, including children, names or racial slurs, and hatred sometimes escalating to physical violence on one side. Premature birth due to fear, terrorized children pissing in their pants, and desperate adults on the other. During these recurring acts, the majority of the Roma families temporarily fled the settlement.